Today’s conflicts are not only won on the battlefield, but through the use of websites and blogs, over the airwaves and on the front pages of our newspapers.

I didn’t hate Donald Rumsfeld. 

This is a time in which warfare is being waged in the realms of space and cyberspace. In China, the recent test of an anti-satellite missile has shown that our network of satellites could be vulnerable to an attack that could cripple both U.S. military and civilian communications. Small bands of organized hackers earlier this year demonstrated by their attacks on Estonia, that the governments and financial institutions of advanced nations can be paralyzed through cyber attacks.

These enemies have learned a crucial lesson about warfare in the 21st century — a lesson others seem slow in understanding. Today’s conflicts are not only won on the battlefield, but through the use of websites and blogs, over the airwaves and on the front pages of our newspapers. Through skillful propaganda operations, the enemy successfully leverages their asymmetric attacks to encourage potential recruits to join their violent cause and to try to convince those of us in free nations to give in to hopelessness, self-doubt and despair.

Their decentralized networks have been able to effectively employ the tools of the Information Age, while the U.S. government remains ponderous, muscle-bound and unable to respond in real time to the deceits of these enemies. To succeed in this first struggle of the 21st century, we will need fresh thinking and capabilities well beyond the Defense Department. If free people are to meet the challenges posed by what will be a long struggle against violent extremists, we will need all elements of national power, private as well as public — diplomatic, economic, as well as intelligence and military to work in concert. We will need to rethink and rearrange our domestic and global institutions designed for the Industrial Age to better suit the Information Age.

Emphasis mine.  He makes sense to me.

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7 Comments

Filed under CND, IA, Idea War, Info Warriors

7 responses to “Today’s conflicts are not only won on the battlefield, but through the use of websites and blogs, over the airwaves and on the front pages of our newspapers.

  1. Oh, I hated Rumsfeld for other reasons. On this one, he paid me quite nicely to do a very nice study you’d love to read.

    But, of course, you can’t, as it’s not mine to give out.

  2. Is the current SECDEF implementing your recommendations?

  3. “Small bands of organized hackers earlier this year demonstrated by their attacks on Estonia, that the governments and financial institutions of advanced nations can be paralyzed through cyber attacks.”

    Small bands of hackers can be employed by national interests (Russia in the above case) do the dirty work and then be disavowed. Also, consider the false flag potential.

    I think a lot of the “Second Great Game”, as it were, will take place virtually.

  4. I think many acts of “war” are going to take place in realms unrecognizable to most Americans, and they won’t even notice they are being attacked, and our leaders may give up even trying to explain it to us.

  5. Pingback: Donald Rumsfeld Condemns False Newsweek Story on Koran Flushing: You Can’t Apologize to the Dead | NewsBusters.org | Civilian Irregular Information Defense Group